• Thank you friends readers and passers-by for your continuous support to my blog. I will not be able to update often now and many articles and short story left hanging in the draft box due to the pressure of time lately but nevertheless I am trying to cope with it and will post few as time goes by.

    Pleasant day and have a good life.

    Love

    Sanaa

    Good things come to those who wait.
    Better things come to those who try.
    Best things come to those who believe.
    Desired things come to those who pray.

    "Islamic Thinking"

    A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving.
    Lao Tzu

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Looking For A Job?

Dear friends and readers,

It is actually a hectic weekend with Hari Raya open house still on and wedding invitations. Meeting friends and family members on this occasion will normally talk about food and how many houses more to go and food everywhere. But, something different happen when I was at a gathering on Friday evening. Our topic of conversation involves around candidates for jobs, mind-set and preparation they made for the interviews. I have not been to any interview for long and not even update my résumé so in a way I have lost contact in that scenario.

Employer saying graduates now does not prepare themselves for the job although they desperately need a job. Few vacancy needs seniors in specific fields because of their experience not just paper qualifications and few looking for new, young and vibrant candidates. Many candidates have paper qualification needed but not many have the human touch, pr, ability to express themselves and many more personal skill.

From my short acquaintance with few high-profile managers, senior partner or even the human resources manager their dilemma and misery about the same. It is now a very competitive market but unfortunately our graduates does not prepare themselves well for the job interview. The most common and lacking attitude are conversation, confident level and a bit on self-grooming. In short all companies still need and looking for combination of both ; a paper qualification and self-assurance.

Below are tips for job seekers. It might not correspond for our local job market but I am sure it will help us in preparing ourselves for interviews. We need to be on top of others in this competitive world.

Pleasant reading and my best wishes to all job seekers. My sincerely advise is trained our ears and ourselves and be a good listener. From there pick up the best and be the best. GOOD LUCK

Love

Sanaa 25/09/11

*****

Why Should We Hire You?

By Carole Martin, Monster Contributing Writer

This is another broad interview question that can take you down the wrong road unless you’ve done some thinking ahead of time. This question is purely about selling yourself. Think of yourself as the product. Why should the customer buy?

The Wrong Track

Spencer answers by saying, “Because I need and want a job.” That’s nice, but the bottom line here is, “What can you do for us?”

Mariana says, “I’m a hard worker and really want to work for this company.” The majority of people think of themselves as hard workers — and why this company?

The Right Track

Tom’s answer to this question is, “Because I’m a good fit for the position.” Getting warmer, but more details, please.

Sharon answers, “I have what it takes to solve problems and do the job.” This is the best answer so far. Expand on this, and you’ve got it.

Develop a Sales Statement

The more detail you give, the better your answer will be. This is not a time to talk about what you want. Rather, it is a time to summarize your accomplishments and relate what makes you unique.

Product Inventory Exercise

The bottom line of this question is, “What can you do for this company?”

Start by looking at the job description or posting. What is the employer stressing as requirements of the job? What will it take to get the job done? Make a list of those requirements.

Next, do an inventory to determine what you have to offer as a fit for those requirements. Think of two or three key qualities you have to offer that match those the employer is seeking. Don’t underestimate personal traits that make you unique; your energy, personality type, working style and people skills are all very relevant to any job.

The Sales Pitch: You Are the Solution

From the list of requirements, match what you have to offer and merge the two into a summary statement. This is your sales pitch. It should be no more than two minutes long and should stress the traits that make you unique and a good match for the job.

Example: “From our conversations, it sounds as if you’re looking for someone to come in and take charge immediately. It also sounds like you are experiencing problems with some of your database systems. With my seven years of experience working with financial databases, I have saved companies thousands of dollars by streamlining systems. My high energy and quick learning style enable me to hit the ground and size up problems rapidly. My colleagues would tell you I’m a team player who maintains a positive attitude and outlook. I have the ability to stay focused in stressful situations and can be counted on when the going gets tough. I’m confident I would be a great addition to your team.”

What Makes You Unique?

Completing an exercise around this question will allow you to concentrate on your unique qualities. Like snowflakes, no two people are alike. Take some time to think about what sets you apart from others.

* “Never miss deadlines.”
* “Bring order to chaos.”
* “Good sense of humor.”
* “Great attention to detail.”

Let the interviewer know that you have been listening to the problem and have what it takes to do the job — that you are the solution to the problem.

*****

Top 10 Interview Tips Great interviews arise from careful groundwork. You can ace your next interview if you:

1. Enter into a state of relaxed concentration. This is the state from which great basketball players or Olympic skaters operate. You’ll need to quiet the negative self chatter in your head through meditation or visualization prior to sitting down in the meeting. You’ll focus on the present moment and will be less apt to experience lapses in concentration, nervousness, self-doubt and self-condemnation.

2. Act spontaneous, but be well prepared. Be your authentic self, professional yet real. Engage in true conversation with your interviewer, resting on the preparation you did prior to coming to the meeting. Conduct several trial runs with another person simulating the interview before it actually occurs. It’s the same as anticipating the questions you’ll be asked on a final exam.

3. Set goals for the interview. It is your job to leave the meeting feeling secure that the interviewer knows as much as he or she possibly can about your skills, abilities, experience and achievements. If you sense there are misconceptions, clear them up before leaving. If the interviewer doesn’t get around to asking you important questions, pose them yourself (diplomatically) and answer them. Don’t leave the meeting without getting your own questions answered so that you have a clear idea of what you would be getting yourself into. If possible, try to get further interviews, especially with other key players.

4. Know the question behind the question. Ultimately, every question boils down to, “Why should we hire you?” Be sure you answer that completely. If there is a question about your meeting deadlines, consider whether the interviewer is probing delicately about your personal life, careful not to ask you whether your family responsibilities will interfere with your work. Find away to address fears if you sense they are present.

5. Follow up with an effective “thank you” letter. Don’t write this letter lightly. It is another opportunity to market yourself. Find some areas discussed in the meeting and expand upon them in your letter. Writing a letter after a meeting is a very minimum. Standing out among the other candidates will occur if you thoughtfully consider this follow up letter as an additional interview in which you get to do all the talking. Propose useful ideas that demonstrate your added value to the team.

6. Consider the interviewer’s agenda. Much is on the shoulders of the interviewer. He or she has the responsibility of hiring the right candidate. Your ability to do the job will need to be justified. “Are there additional pluses here?” “Will this person fit the culture of this organization?” These as well as other questions will be heavily on the interviewer’s mind. Find ways to demonstrate your qualities above and beyond just doing the job.

7. Expect to answer the question, “Tell me about yourself.” This is a pet question of prepared and even unprepared interviewers. Everything you include should answer the question, “Why should we hire you?” Carefully prepare your answer to include examples of achievements from your work life that closely match the elements of the job before you. Obviously, you’ll want to know as much about the job description as you can before you respond to the question.

8. Watch those nonverbal clues. Experts estimate that words express only 30% to 35% of what people actually communicate; facial expressions and body movements and actions convey the rest. Make and keep eye contact. Walk and sit with a confident air. Lean toward an interviewer to show interest and enthusiasm. Speak with a well-modulated voice that supports appropriate excitement for the opportunity before you.

9. Be smart about money questions. Don’t fall into the trap of telling the interviewer your financial expectations. You may be asking for too little or too much money and in each case ruin your chances of being offered the job. Instead, ask what salary range the job falls in. Attempt to postpone a money discussion until you have a better understanding of the scope of responsibilities of the job.

10. Don’t hang out your dirty laundry. Be careful not to bare your soul and tell tales that are inappropriate or beyond the scope of the interview. State your previous experience in the most positive terms. Even if you disagreed with a former employer, express your enthusiasm for earlier situations as much as you can. Whenever you speak negatively about another person or situation in which you were directly involved, you run the risk (early in the relationship) of appearing like a troubled person who may have difficulty working with others.

Credit to Job Center : http://jobs.asiabot.com/resources/top10interviewtips.shtml

Compiled by : Sanaa 25/09/11

One Response

  1. Very good tips..thanks

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